Showing posts with label tail. Show all posts
Showing posts with label tail. Show all posts

Mission Impossible Mouse

Mission Impossible Mouse
"I am doing a Tom Cruise."
▶Mouse has a great plan to get the cheesy snack for dinner comical impossible mission finds dingo crocodile cow tiger squirrel moose play wallaby tortoise at comical if mission to wolf puma boar gecko bug flea robin monkey platypus marlin tadpole comical on impossible at mission to mouse or finds crab canary seal sheep weasel fish finch goldfish zebra alligator comical if impossible is mission an mouse finds owl beetle bass ostrich thrush amusing penguin snake horse comical is impossible as mission at mouse pelican albatross bat elephant dolphin butterfly vulture gold spider comical go mission it mouse jackal eagle seahorse wildebeest baboon find toad frog octopus funny impossible hunting swan snail perch orangutan turtle elk chimp possum emu whale comical is impossible chimpanzee deer rhinoceros carp magpie rat goat ape lemur mouse wombat ◀

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▶ | finds | peculiar animals free odd playing sex| photos photo funny | I am doing a Tom Cruise. ◀

Husky is Frozen Stiff

Husky is frozen.
"I told you not to stay out here too long, George!"
Laughable Canine Images
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STIFF DOG
frozen, husky, dog, cold, freezing, outdoors, two, stiff, snow, tail Ridiculous Depictions Comical Portrayals Humorous Snaps Amusing Shots Entertaining Images Ludicrous Playful Likenesses Silly Snapshots Jolly Pictures snicker grin free news money Absurd picture gifs Curious Eerie Hilarious Ghastly Kooky Miscellaneous Jolly animation Farcical Peculiar Whimsical Far-Out Hysterical Freaky Jocose Dreadful Effect Laughable Oddball Crazy Peculiar free news image photo gif money cash

Cat With Odd Ginger Tail

Cat's Odd Tail.
"You know George there is something not right about this tail."
Funny Animal Pictures
Australian Blog
 Adventure Australia
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STRANGE GINGER TAIL
three, cats, ginger, tail, odd, comical, strange, group, room, carpet, foolery, tom, Ridiculous Varmint Depictions Comical Critter Portrayals Humorous Creature Snaps Amusing Zoological Shots Entertaining Feral Images Ludicrous Monster Depictions Playful Varmint Likenesses Silly Beast Snapshots Jolly quadruped Pictures snicker Views grin free news money cash internet surf Awful Accouterments Creepy Trappings Absurd Curious Business Eerie Doings Hilarious Ghastly Concerns Haunting Matters Kooky Miscellaneous Jolly Strange Tangibles Farcical Peculiar Objects Whimsical Far-Out Matters Hysterical Freaky Tackle Jocose Dreadful Effect Laughable Oddball Regalia Crazy Peculiar Matters free news image photo picture money cash Internet surf

Heart on Dog's Body

"I love you with my whole body."
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Australian Blog
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LOVE YOU!
#puppy #dog #love #birth #mark #shape #body #cute #friendly
I love you with my whole body patch birth mark pooch unusual peculiar Ridiculous Varmint Depictions Comical Critter Portrayals Humorous Creature Snaps Amusing Zoological Shots Entertaining Feral Images Ludicrous Monster Depictions Playful Varmint Likenesses Silly Beast Snapshots Jolly quadruped Pictures Snigger Views grin free news money cash internet surf Awful Accoutrements Creepy Trappings Absurd Curious Business Eerie Doings Hilarious Ghastly Concerns Haunting Matters Kooky Miscellaneous Jolly Strange Tangibles Farcical Peculiar Objects Whimsical Far-Out Matters Hysterical Freaky Tackle Jocose Dreadful Effect Laughable Oddball Regalia Crazy Peculiar Matters free news image photo picture money cash internet surf

A Mermaid? No a Dugong!

Early traditional legends describe mermaids:  supernatural beings that lived in the sea, a combination of human and fish. As time went on, they were described as having a human body and a fish’s tail. But where did the mermaid legend come from?  For centuries, sailors travelled the oceans and returned to their homelands with tales of exotic creatures from distant shores, one of which was the mermaid. These sailors had been on the high seas for months. They may have been dehydrated, suffering from sunstroke, ill or simply lonely.  They saw creature with smooth bodies and long flowing hair swimming through the water. Mermaids!
Mermaid enticing a ship at sea
Of course to our eyes a dugong (Dugong dugori) does not look much like a mermaid. But to a lonely sailor with the sun in his eyes, these graceful aquatic human-like creatures could have captured the imagination. The long flowing hair was possibly sea grasses, which the dugong feeds on.  In an early record in his book, A Voyage to New Holland, the explorer Captain William Dampier wrote in 1699 about a shark that his men had caught, slaughtered and ate.b He describes that in the mouth of one:
".. . we found the head and bones of a hippopotamus; the. hairy lips of which were still sound and not putrfied, and the jaw was also firm, out of which we plucked a great many teeth, 2 of them 8 inches long and as big as a man’s thumb, small at one end, and a little crooked. . ."
Dampier was describing a dugong. In an earlier book from 1688, A New Voyage Around the World, he writes of the dugong’s close cousin, the manatee:
"This creature is about the bigness of a horse, and 10 or 12 foot long. The mouth of it is much like the mouth of a cow, having great thick lips. The eyes are no bigger than a small pea; the ears are only two small holes on each side of the head. The neck is short and thick, bigger than the head. The biggest part of this creature is at the shoulders where it has two large fins, one on each side of its belly."
In Dampier’s time, there were many natural discoveries being made in yet undescribed lands like New Holland (Australia). Even though there are no hippopotamuses in Shark Bay, Western Australia, Dampier can perhaps be forgiven for thinking there were. Dugongs are more closely related to hippos and elephants than they are to marine mammals like whales and dolphins.
Dugongs, manatees (Trichechus spp.) and the extinct Steller’s Sea Cow (Hydrodamalis gigas) are in the animal order Sirenia, named for the beautiful sea sirens of classical mythology, a sea nymph, part woman and part bird. Legends tell of sea nymphs bewitching sailors with their siren song, luring ships to a shattering end (in rocky seabeds. Maybe the bewitching sound that entranced the lonely sailors was the whistling sound made by the large, strong male dugongs to keep their herds together.
Dugongs are large creatures, up to 3 metres long and weighing 400 kilograms. Even though they have small ears and eyes, their hearing and eyesight are excellent. Their heads are round and the mouth on then large fleshy snout faces down towards the seabed, which makes it easy for dugongs to feed on their favourite food - the young shoots of sea grasses. These grow in the muddy beds of shallow waters in northern Australia. Because they graze on sea grasses, dugongs are commonly called sea cows. Dugongs also have moustaches - heavy bristles that are excellent tor helping find the sea grasses in the murky water stirred up when they tear out the whole plant, roots and all. They manoeuvre the sea grasses into their mouths with their sensitive upper lip.
Dugong swimming with fish
These marine oddities are slow and graceful. They steer and balance with their front flippers using them to ‘walk’ as they graze. They have a fluked or ‘wing-shaped’ tail which beats slowly up and down moving them through the water. Adult males and some elderly females have tusks. These are useful weapons for males during breeding season, when they need to fight off competing males.
Dugongs are slow breeders, giving birth under the water to only one pup about every three years. The calf often rides on the mother’s back or swims nearby; never straying far. They suckle for up to 18 months from the teats close to the base of die flippers. The calf begins feeding on sea grass within a few weeks of birth and remains with the mother until it is nearly the same size as her and is fully weaned. Its place will then be taken by another pup.
 Australiana by Ty Buchanan 
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Crocodile Wins Lotto

"Yippee!  I won the lotto."
Funny Animal Pictures
Australian Blog
 Adventure Australia
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JUMPING CROCODILE
#crocodile #jumper #water #river #stream #wins #lotto #joy #happy
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New Ankylosaur Identified in Australia - Kinbarrasaurus ieversi

Australia has a new dinosaur and a handsome devil he is. He has the necessary accouterments such as spiny tail, armour with spines and size. Unfortunately, he has a beak not teeth. Well, you can't have everything.
kunbarrasaurus kunbarrasaurus ieversi dinosaus ankylosaur
Kinbarrasaurus ieversi is a member of the ankylosaur family, an early type, a new genus. The animal foraged for leafy material and grass. The fossil specimen remained on the shelf from 1989 until now. It is complete showing fossilized skin texture and stomach contents.

Though ankylosaur, kunbarrasaurus has features unlike any other animal. Its ear and nasal structure is unique, though it is similar to the tuatara reptile. apparently, it helped to keep the creature cool. The skull was easy to study because there was no armour covering it. Dinosaurs usually have armour fused to the skull.
 Anthropology by Ty Buchanan 
Australian Blog
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Dogs Alike

Similar alike snow dogs
"You know George we are so alike."
"Shut it, snow dog!"
Funny Animal Pictures
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same dogs two pair similar alike different sitting

Normal Cat

 "How am I sitting on this chair?  That is a secret."
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Funny Animal Photos by Ty Buchanan
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Death Adders Are Causing Their Own Extinction

Australia's death adder is contributing to its own extinction. Moving around to hunt their prey is not their method. An adder tempts its victims by laying in ambush and wiggling its tail tip. By wiggling its tail, however, it is noticed by cane toads, frogs and lizards who eagerly gulp down the tasty meal.

After cane toads were introduced into Australia death adder numbers plummeted. Ironically as the cane toad attacks the snake it is bitten, so after its meal the cane toad dies - mutual suicide. Even if the snake eats the toad it will end up dead because cane toads are poisonous.

For millions of years death adders have survived by enticing their prey within easy reach. Now this behavior is leading to their demise. Man cannot intervene to prevent this. There is nothing that can be done.
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Wildlife

Muscles Created for Nanobots

Can nanobots have muscles? Researchers have made very strong, flexible muscles that could be used by nanobots to travel around the body diagnosing and treating medical conditions.

As flexible limbs much like octopus tentacles, artificial muscles can move objects a thousand times heavier. Thinner than a human hair, the "yarns" are cheap to make. They could potentially be used for pumps, valves, stirrers and flagella for drug discovery.

They were created by applying an electrochemical charge to spun carbon nanotubes making them twist into helical yarns. They are ideal to attach to bots as a tiny tail, a flagella, to propel the bot forward.

This was a truly international breakthrough. Participants in the work were the University of Wollongong, Australia, the University of Texas and Hanyang University of Korea.
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Science