Showing posts with label bird. Show all posts
Showing posts with label bird. Show all posts

Australia Had Giant Chickens

Mercury pollution

Aussie

birds price brahma chicken breed poultry video they're luke big chickens fans australia generally eggs brahmas quirky Australia i Had i Giant i Chickens friendly placid love features light show country bred good feed eat size large Australia it Had it Giant it Chickens introduced bazza personalities people giant birds a price a brahma a chicken a giant breed a poultry a video a they're a luke a big a chickens a fans a australia a generally a eggs a brahmas a quirky a friendly a placid a love a features a light a show a country a bred a good a feed a eat a size a large a introduced a bazza a personalities a people a giant birds b price b brahma b chicken b breed b poultry b video b they're b luke b big b chickens b fans b australia b generally b eggs b brahmas b quirky birds c price c brahma c chicken c breed c poultry c video c they're c luke birds d price d brahma d chicken birds e price
Giant chickens

Kookaburra is Mocking You

Here is laughing at you kid, just a Kookaburra is. laughing bird.
Is that someone laughing at me? No it's the Laughing Jackass, the kookaburra. This long living bird can be around for two decades.   Early settlers thought they were being mocked in their attempts at farming as most new arrivals were convicts.  The "noise' closely resembles a laugh. kookaburra.
Kookaburra laughing
A dominant male bird will begin the call to mark his territory; then the rest of the family will join in.  Young will stay with their parents for up to five years. The youngsters will even sit on the eggs and feed new hatchlings. Diet is varied: small mammals, amphibians (frogs), invertebrate (worms), reptiles and insects.
  Mocking Kookaburra
Native to eastern Australia, Kookaburras were introduced to WA and Tasmania. They are good survivors and probably did not need this help. Dacelo are the world's largest kingfisher.   The bird has become an icon:  in poetry, on household products,
in newsreels and on cricket balls.
 
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VOICE OF A FEATHER
laughing live, male, call, territory, branch, dacelo, kingfisher australiana young mocking kookaburra is mocking you.

Birds Know Who is Related to Them

Zoology shows men scorn their stepsons, like birds.
It is common knowledge that cuckoos "dump" their eggs in other birds' nests to put the responsibility of bringing up cuckoo chicks to strangers. It appeared that birds could not tell the difference between there own offspring and cuckoos. However, this belief has been proved wrong by research on the southern pied babbler of Africa.
southern pied babbler
This bird lives in a group of up to 14 individuals. It has been observed that the dominant male will push out unrelated subordinate males. Females did not show any favor. It is purely a male thing. The prime behavior of the birds is the practice of male birds helping to raise the young of other mating pairs. They obviously remember who is related to whom, particularly in regard to their own young.

The males thrown out of groups do not fair well in life generally. Their health suffers. They become skinny and remain that way. Seldom do they become dominant males. There could be a message for humans here: perhaps men who have children with women who already have children by other men treat their own offspring better and scorn their stepchildren.
 
africa, babbler, bird, chicks, dominant, males, pied, pirs, reject, southern, unrelated, young articles news politics economics society anthropology historiography history sociology people nations country asia europe africa u.s. south america central Mediterranean eastern western interesting unique technology free news sex

Nancy Bird Walton Female Aviator of Australia

Nancy Bird Walton
A plane landed on a grazier's property to rescue the owner from a flood.  Onlookers were aghast to see that the pilot was a woman.  This was the 1930s and female pilots were only accepted in the United States.  Nancy Bird Walton was the pilot - she had the right name.

The woman who would not take no for an answer had initially taken flying lessons from the famous aviator Sir Charles Kingsford Smith. Because she was short he told her to bring a cushion.  Her pilots' test involved a climbing to 450 meters then landing near a fixed spot on the ground.  She passed gaining an A grade licence.  her career began in 1928 flying a yellow Gypsy Moth at an air pageant in New South Wales.

In those days a commercial pilot had to be a mechanic as well.  She was capable.  Securing a log book, knowledge of meteorology and navigation skills she was on her way.  The Gypsy Moth was ideal for Barnstorming around the country.  She saved some money.  Her purchase of Leopard Moth set her up in commercial business carrying freight and passengers.

During her working life she flew to remote areas for the Royal Flying Doctor Service becoming the first female owner pilot of the Far West Children's Health Scheme.  Notably, she became the Commandant of the Women's Air Training Corp when WWII broke out.

Lone Seagull

comical seagull on no seagulls sign
Gseagull sits on no seagulls sign
"Why no other seagulls here?"
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ONE SEAGULL
#seagull #bird #lost #alone #sign #keep #out #solo #cold
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Bird Uber Taxi Operator

"The ervice is better since you became an UBER operator!"
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UBER BIRD
#bird #animal #lift #transport #uber #service #carry
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cat wants turkey

cat eats turkey
"I want to eat it now!"
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CAT TURKEY DINNER
#cat #turkey #watch #eat #food #roast #bird #cook
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Australia's Bird the Emu

Early European settlers were amazed by the emu.  Governor Lachlan Macquarie was so impressed that, in 1822, he sent two emus as gifts to the Governor-General of India, the Marquis of Hastings.  When Macquarie set sail from Australia back to England on the ship Surry, he wrote that voyaging with the passengers were "pets" that included six emus, travelling in roomy well aired pens  well-aired pens. The animals were to be given as gifts to friends and patrons of Governor Macquarie back in England. Unfortunately many of the pets, including one of the largest emus died on the trip.
Emu with young chicks
In l791 John Harris, who arrived in the new colony as a surgeon, wrote that emus were swifter than the fleetest of greyhounds. Emu eggs were described as dark Green with little black specks the of pins.  It is a little larger than goose eggs.  The emu is Australia’s largest bird standing up to 2 metres high. lt has wings but it can°t fly. lt can run really quickly around 50 kilometres per hour. The legs are also yery powerful and used for fighting, especially if males are fighting over females. Emus are common throughout mainland Australia but not in dense rainforest and urbanised areas. They are highly nomadic, which means they must move as they need in search of food, water and shelter.

An emu°s courtship is a boisterous affair. There ISs lots of bobbing up and down, weaying and dipping, throat drumming, grunting and fluffing of feathers.  Mating begins late in December: The female flattens a platform of grass into a large nest and lays her clutch of between 7 and 11 dark green eggs lthough it could be as high as 20.  lf it is a good season and there is plenty of rain she might lay one or two more clutches with different males.

After laying her eggs she leaves. The male has the sole responsibility for parenting.  When the eggs are laid, the male gets broody and begins incubation before the clutch is completed. The female stops mating with the male but might continue to lay eggs in the nest. which are fertilised by other males. It takes 56 days of incubation before the eggs hatch and striped chicks appear, usually in early spring. During this time the male emu sits on the eggs. rarely leaying the nest and only standing to turn the eggs every few hours.  He doesn't eat or drink. Drawing on fat reserves, he looses about eight kilograms.
Biology by Ty Buchanan
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emu australian bird
Captain owl in charge
"I am captain of this ship!"
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Go Liberace Owl!

Liberace bird
"Liberace is Me!"
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The Chestnut-Crowned Babbler Bird Uses Sentences

It seems that bird calls evolve like human language. Research on the chestnut-crowned babbler shows the cooperative bird is able to change the order of sounds to make new "sentences" with different meanings. The babbler does not sing like other birds. It makes a series of unique sounds.
The chestnut-crowned babbler bird uses sentences
Analysis shows that the bird is communicating in different ways by stringing sounds together. It has two main categories of calls A and B. If flying, only AB calls are made. In the nest with young birds BAB calls predominate.

When different calls were played back, AB calls initiated flight in the birds that heard it and BAB sounds caused them to go the nest. These "sentences" were definitely perceived as unique instructions. Even when sound prompt elements were changed for the sentences the birds could still tell the difference.

This is the first time a vocabulary type structure in communication has been observe in any animal other than human. The first sound in The A and B structure determines what the overall meaning is, This is similar to human words, for example like the C in CAT (when AT can be used multiple times in any human sentence). It would be pertinent to assume that language in humans began with a very simple system as in these birds.
 
 Economics by Ty Buchanan 
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Banded Stilts Water Bird Always Finds the Water

As soon as inland rain arrives at Australian lakes, the banded stilt water bird makes its presence felt as well. It somehow knows that the rains have started from several hundred miles away.  This useful ability determines their way of life.

They don't hang about long. Rainfall will be limited so they move on to the next fresh rains spot. Birds were tagged with satellite transmitters. One bird flew directly to a saline wetland 1,000 miles away in two days. Another bird got there four days later, but the destination for both was the same.

Banded stilts do not have to migrate for improved feeding conditions. Their inbuilt system allows them to always find water. Why don't other birds do this? Obviously, evolution is "hit-and-miss". Animals develop abilities purely by chance. This is why evolution is successful. Animals move into niches that line up with their attributes.
Science by Ty Buchanan
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Wedge-Tailed Eagle Diet Identified

It is amazing how little we know about supposedly common animals, ones that are easily seen and in contact with us. Rabbits were thought to be the main diet for the wedge-tailed eagle. However, the bird consumes other things as well. It should be noted that rabbits were introduced and the eagle must have have relied on other prey before the nuisance animal arrived.

When viral haemorrhagic disease (VHD) wiped out the rabbit population the wedge-tailed eagle actually fared better. Castings, the vomit of eagles, showed that their diet consisted of 20 bird species, seven reptiles, 19 mammals and a crustacean.

Some mammals they ate were large such as the eastern grey kangaroo. The common Galah was a native bird high on the diet. Rabbits are easy to catch when they are plentiful. A fall in rabbit numbers pushed them back to their traditional food sources. Despite the move, native animals have survived. Nature seems to be in balance. 
Conservation by Ty Buchanan
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