Showing posts with label scientific. Show all posts
Showing posts with label scientific. Show all posts

Longevity Will Require Genetic Manipulation and Drug Therapy.

It may sound good to extend life by gene manipulation But it will be complex and expensive. Taxpayers will not want to pay for it. It will be okay for the wealthy. The ordinary person will lose. There will be a tax burden to provide for aged care. It could be a new industry. We do not really need it.

complicated genetic literacy project skip content menu glp mission financial transparency governorship team glp boards contributing writers write glp donate copyright contact topics daily food agriculture daily human agricultural laws regulations ancestry evolution biomedical regulations ethics biomedicine disease biotech communications brain neuroscience chemicals pesticides crops food epigenetics gene therapy health wellness human gene editing crispr breeding techniques nbts personal genomics science future sustainability greengenes synthetic biology infographics videos podcasts glp articles glp human genetics glp food agriculture special sections glp biotech profiles bees butterflies talking biotech gmo science gmo science ii gmo science iii biotech 2.0 faqs gene editing crispr gene therapy synthetic biology epigenetics personal genomics regulation bioethics gmo faq research search glp library search infographics search videos browse authors browse sources glp rss feeds external resources search menu menu glp mission financial transparency governorship team glp boards contributing writers write glp donate copyright contact topics.

daily food agriculture daily human agricultural laws regulations ancestry evolution biomedical regulations ethics biomedicine disease biotech communications brain neuroscience chemicals pesticides crops food epigenetics gene therapy health wellness human gene editing crispr breeding techniques nbts personal genomics science future sustainability greengenes synthetic biology infographics videos podcasts glp articles glp human genetics glp food agriculture special sections glp biotech profiles bees butterflies talking biotech gmo science gmo science ii gmo science iii biotech 2.0 faqs gene editing crispr gene therapy synthetic biology epigenetics personal genomics regulation bioethics gmo faq research search glp library search infographics search videos browse authors browse sources glp rss feeds external resources search menu participate newsletter donate subscribe donate 58k 5.7k search menu glp mission financial transparency governorship team glp boards contributing writers write glp donate copyright contact topics daily food agriculture daily human agricultural laws regulations ancestry evolution biomedical regulations.

ethics biomedicine disease biotech communications brain neuroscience chemicals pesticides crops food epigenetics gene therapy health wellness human gene editing crispr breeding techniques nbts personal genomics science future sustainability greengenes synthetic biology infographics videos podcasts glp articles glp human genetics glp food agriculture special sections glp biotech profiles bees butterflies talking biotech gmo science gmo science ii gmo science iii biotech 2.0 faqs gene editing crispr gene therapy synthetic biology epigenetics personal genomics regulation bioethics gmo faq research search glp library search infographics search videos browse authors browse soemicalurces glp rss feeds external resources search menu search menu glp mission financial transparency governorship team glp boards contributing writers write glp donate copyright contact topics daily food agriculture daily human agricultural laws regulations ancestry evolution biomedical regulations ethics biomedicine disease biotech communications brain neuroscience chemicals pesticides crops food epigenetics gene therapy health wellness human gene editing crispr breeding techniques nbts personal genomics science future sustainability greengenes synthetic biology infographics videos podcasts glp articles glp human genetics glp food agriculture special sections glp biotech profiles bees butterflies talking biotech gmo science gmo science ii.

gmo science iii biotech 2.0 faqs gene editing crispr gene therapy synthetic biology epigenetics personal genomics regulation bioethics gmo faq research search glp library search infographics search videos browse authors browse sources glp rss feeds external resources search menu recommended deep-space travel colonization rely genetically engineered life forms life emerged multiple times earth universe glowing trees colonoscopies wonders synthetic biology creating superwoman man benefits human enhancement biotech 2.0 faqs gene editing crispr gene therapy synthetic biology epigenetics personal genomics regulation bioethics gmo faqs fundamentals farming food health safety sustainability labeling regulation bees butterflies facts pesticides pollinators talking biotech explore future food biotech glp biotech profiles analyzing critics shaping debate extending healthy life gene manipulation sounds cool it’s complicated david warmflash genetic literacy project january 26 2015 over same theme emerging ability understand desired manipulate genes explain genetic basis various phenomena biology we’ve flurry news excitement focused genetics athletic ability effects diets personality range diseases behaviors.

same true comes lifespan added dimension it’s duration life extend it’s youthful healthy period researchers aging recently discovered extending lifespan nematode worms caenorhabditis elegans increase period youth health finding thought setback instead launches longevity research phase scientists hone genetic factors harnessed allow older people function younger people today.

science aging maturing age beginning 990s nematode studies led great deal excitement manipulating genes researchers able extend lifespan worms five fold years followed milestone described equivalent human living 400-500 years thought extended period youth vigor accounted increased lifespan study conducted university massachusetts tells different story assessing aging looking variety traits umass research suggests nematode lifespans extended manipulation aging genes actually dominated long healthy youthful period saw extension health mutants aged certain traits invariably trade-off extended period frailty inactivity animal principal investigator umass study heidi tissenbaum different previous studies looked traits associated nematode health tissenbaum’s team identified variety traits used define term healthspan distinguished lifespan discouraging finding push longevity research direction scientists begin honing genes extend health association lifespan extension genes remain physically active age genes allow play tennis we’re 70 similar 40 longevity sole criteria notes tissenbaum professor molecular cellular cancer biology umass program molecular medicine advances.

world nematodes nematodes used great deal aging research they’re simplest multicellular organisms however recent times produced several encouraging achievements life extension research involving animals example methuselah fly naming test animal character hebrew mythology lived 900 years investigators university bern switzerland recently succeeded extending lifespan drosophila melanogaster flies 50-60 percent it’s totally clear time added d melanogaster lifespan dominated extended period health however immediate effects genetic manipulation swiss researchers employed suggests extended health lifespan increase known azot altered gene swiss technique causes efficient elimination bad aging cells throughout fly’s life same time healthy cells maintained support body tissues words azot enhanced quality control gene improved quality control lifetime mean better health azot gene conserved humans fly.

study suggests analogous human effect possible study involving mice brown university revealed aging-relevant gene it’s known myc gene activity reduced mouse lifespan extended percent moreover longevity models involving mammals various health issues commonly associated mouse human aging reduced association lifespan increase specifically brown study showed reduction osteoporosis immunity problems cardiac fibrosis mice decreased myc activity mice incredibly normal long-lived john sedivy senior author study emphasizes important point longevity models caloric restriction treatment rapamycin animals live longer health issues moving ladder larger animals brings recently published results genome bowhead whales animals lifespans approaching 200 years study identified 80 genes able adapt otherwise apply humans we’re likely acquire ability dive underwater equipment hours time hope.

various studies involving species lead age whale water distant shore spot group century-old humans running beach would age twenty david warmflash astrobiologist physician science writer follow cosmicevolution read saying twitter shares facebook twitter google pinterest linkedin digg del stumbleupon tumblr vkontakte print email flattr reddit buffer love weibo pocket xing odnoklassniki managewp.org whatsapp meneame blogger amazon yahoo mail gmail aol newsvine hackernews evernote myspace mail.ru viadeo line flipboard comments yummly sms viber telegram subscribe skype facebook messenger kakao livejournal yammer edgar fintel mix instapaper popular japan poised permit gene editing human embryos 2019 mushrooms protect honey bee disease-carrying varroa mite study shows viewpoint glyphosate study suggesting danger honeybee microbiota detailed sophisticated—and wrong ‘chemical free’ organic industry’s unacknowledged ‘pesticide problem’ sexual assault brain memory gaps unusual roundup-cancer lawsuits filed we’re early stages genetic revolution.

worried viewpoint activists promotion ‘fog misinformation’ gmos challenges science communicators teaching evolution siege turkey israel india pentagon darpa program targeting crop losses turn insects ‘easily weaponized’ biological army critics claim defining life it’s created lab alive maoa cdh13 ‘human warrior genes’ violent criminals—and society popular japan poised permit gene editing human embryos 2019 mushrooms protect honey bee disease-carrying varroa mite study shows viewpoint glyphosate study suggesting danger honeybee microbiota detailed sophisticated—and wrong ‘chemical free’ organic industry’s unacknowledged ‘pesticide problem’ sexual assault brain memory gaps unusual roundup-cancer lawsuits filed we’re early stages genetic revolution worried viewpoint activists promotion ‘fog misinformation’ gmos challenges science communicators teaching evolution siege turkey israel india pentagon darpa program targeting crop losses turn insects ‘easily weaponized’ biological army critics claim defining life it’s created lab alive maoa cdh13 ‘human warrior genes’ violent criminals—and society recommended deep-space travel colonization.

rely genetically engineered life forms life emerged multiple times earth universe glowing trees colonoscopies wonders synthetic biology creating superwoman man benefits human enhancement biotech 2.0 faqs gene editing crispr gene therapy synthetic biology epigenetics personal genomics regulation bioethics gmo faqs fundamentals farming food health safety sustainability labeling regulation bees butterflies facts pesticides pollinators talking biotech explore future food biotech glp biotech profiles analyzing critics shaping debate mission financial transparency governorship team glp boards contributing writers write glp donate copyright contact topics daily food agriculture daily human agricultural laws regulations ancestry evolution biomedical regulations ethics biomedicine disease biotech communications brain neuroscience chemicals pesticides crops food epigenetics gene therapy health wellness human gene editing crispr breeding techniques nbts personal genomics science future sustainability greengenes synthetic biology infographics video podcasts glp articles glp human genetics glp food agriculture special sections glp biotech profiles.

bees butterflies talking biotech gmo science gmo science ii gmo science iii research search glp library search infographics search videos browse authors browse sources glp rss feeds external resources © 2012 2018 genetic literacy project scroll back top glp articles glp food agriculture glp human genetics topics daily food agriculture daily human agricultural laws regulations ancestry evolution biomedical regulations ethics biomedicine disease biotech communications brain neuroscience chemicals pesticides crops food epigenetics gene therapy health wellness human gene editing crispr breeding techniques nbts personal genomics science future sustainability greengenes synthetic biology podcasts infographics videos special sections glp biotech profiles bees butterflies talking biotech gmo science gmo science ii gmo science iii gene editing crispr faqs gene therapy faqs synthetic biology faqs epigenetics faqs personal genomics faqs regulation bioethics faqs gmo faqs research search glp library browse authors.

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Longevity
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Australian Customs Makes Big Mistake

Plants destroyed in australia
| Australian has problem importing foreign goods – destruction. australian to customs jo makes ax big um mistake roosters photos security generation adelaide plan email set fri twitter Understand be customs ow makes ka destroys oh mar recognition auction stop australia train surges nation key execute australian ah customs mm big ar destroys map drugs service heysen main corby man adviser shafted days family drug australian ho customs qi makes if perfectly killed coverage missing stranded top years russia heard afp australian ha note menu anti-muslim change home conviction discovered music australian oh customs xi makes mu big ma mistake kangaroos silva millar 00am closure time woman open
australian by customs two ox makes ki big op mistake destroys a big claim smuggling repel victory hours gws left 17pm State-linked bull germany mobile print filipina militants custody trafficking sgt tea trump masterpiece topics enclosure weather broadcasting gatwick today pepper lisa pies monaco sport bromley civilians melbourne orangutans stories news street canberra comeback brisbane house lead reported wheelchair great breaks hopes ricciardo perth opinion stabbings escape arrives mistake tourist local abc kilda view win friend revival police men record rooming hobart channel red photo people connect eagles business white sydney darwin philippines islamic analysis anger zoo contact rant facebook raiders court constitutional oregon kushner |  |
Australian customs

Academic Papers Could Soon Be Publicly Available

The era of academic journals being closed off from the general public by financial barriers is coming to an end. Publishers are terrified by this. It means they will have to get funding from other sources rather than annual subscriptions. There will be a time limit placed on articles, so after a short period they will have to be released so everyone can read them.

This move is being put forward by the UK government. It is pushing for open access from the very beginning of publication. Unfortunately, the government intends to make authors pay publishers. This is unrealistic. Admittedly, university lecturers are in a secure financial position. However, scientists find it difficult to get funding and allocating part of income on publication is another financial burden.

Universities are saying that the government is looking after publishers, protecting their income while passing the cost onto educational institutions. Martin Hall says we must move forward to get full funding in advance. Unfortunately, he does say how this money is to be obtained. UK researchers are planning to offer some work for free while saving their best for payment from journal publishers. This is too much like the present where only 5 per cent of articles are in gold open access.

This does look bleak for publishers who will steadily "go to the wall", and Universities who will pay either way. If most articles are going to be free, then the cost of the fewer "advanced" papers will cost much more. Governments will ultimately pay for the cost as the institutions are largely public bodies. In the current economic climate this cannot be sustained.
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Science

The Science of Carrying a Mug of Coffee

You wouldn't think that finding out how to carry a mug of coffee without spilling it would be a subject for analysis by scientists, but you would be wrong.  Rouslan Krechnetnikov took it upon himself to solve this disruptive daily issue.

This area of study dawned upon him when he watched people struggling with mugs of coffee at a fluid dynamics conference. He thought that the solution wasn't simple.  It was a complex scientific problem.  The coffee carriers gender, age and health would affect the solution.

Tests included walking in a straight line with coffee in hand while looking at the mug or looking ahead.  A sensor in the mug measured spillage of coffee.  Conclusions were that one should walk slower and, wait for it - watch the mug not where you are going.

This sounds like advice leading one to disaster.  "Watch your heads and laps everybody someone's coming who doesn't know where he's going!  Why don't you get a cup you fool?"
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Society

Research Program to Determine Climate Change Impact on Man's Move Out of Africa

It is known that the climate change caused by an asteroid hitting the Earth 65 million years ago led to the extinction of dinosaurs and the rise of mammals. Other extremes in climate pushed humans to move out of Africa. The National Research Council in the US has released a report calling for funding for more research into climate change and the human movement issue.

Paleoanthropologists and geologists plan the following program: find new fossil sites with remote sensing tools to determine when new species arose: drill ancient lake beds in Africa for more information on human evolution: develop regional models on how climate differed in parts of Africa over the last 100,000 years: and educate the general community on how climate change led to Man moving across the world.

A meeting is to take place on 31st March next year to discuss the determinations of the report and how such a program can be initiated. The first priority, of course, is funding. The present economic climate does not bode well in this regard. However, scientific endeavours must more forward.
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Science