Showing posts with label chemical. Show all posts
Showing posts with label chemical. Show all posts

Longevity Will Require Genetic Manipulation and Drug Therapy.

It may sound good to extend life by gene manipulation But it will be complex and expensive. Taxpayers will not want to pay for it. It will be okay for the wealthy. The ordinary person will lose. There will be a tax burden to provide for aged care. It could be a new industry. We do not really need it.

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ethics biomedicine disease biotech communications brain neuroscience chemicals pesticides crops food epigenetics gene therapy health wellness human gene editing crispr breeding techniques nbts personal genomics science future sustainability greengenes synthetic biology infographics videos podcasts glp articles glp human genetics glp food agriculture special sections glp biotech profiles bees butterflies talking biotech gmo science gmo science ii gmo science iii biotech 2.0 faqs gene editing crispr gene therapy synthetic biology epigenetics personal genomics regulation bioethics gmo faq research search glp library search infographics search videos browse authors browse soemicalurces glp rss feeds external resources search menu search menu glp mission financial transparency governorship team glp boards contributing writers write glp donate copyright contact topics daily food agriculture daily human agricultural laws regulations ancestry evolution biomedical regulations ethics biomedicine disease biotech communications brain neuroscience chemicals pesticides crops food epigenetics gene therapy health wellness human gene editing crispr breeding techniques nbts personal genomics science future sustainability greengenes synthetic biology infographics videos podcasts glp articles glp human genetics glp food agriculture special sections glp biotech profiles bees butterflies talking biotech gmo science gmo science ii.

gmo science iii biotech 2.0 faqs gene editing crispr gene therapy synthetic biology epigenetics personal genomics regulation bioethics gmo faq research search glp library search infographics search videos browse authors browse sources glp rss feeds external resources search menu recommended deep-space travel colonization rely genetically engineered life forms life emerged multiple times earth universe glowing trees colonoscopies wonders synthetic biology creating superwoman man benefits human enhancement biotech 2.0 faqs gene editing crispr gene therapy synthetic biology epigenetics personal genomics regulation bioethics gmo faqs fundamentals farming food health safety sustainability labeling regulation bees butterflies facts pesticides pollinators talking biotech explore future food biotech glp biotech profiles analyzing critics shaping debate extending healthy life gene manipulation sounds cool it’s complicated david warmflash genetic literacy project january 26 2015 over same theme emerging ability understand desired manipulate genes explain genetic basis various phenomena biology we’ve flurry news excitement focused genetics athletic ability effects diets personality range diseases behaviors.

same true comes lifespan added dimension it’s duration life extend it’s youthful healthy period researchers aging recently discovered extending lifespan nematode worms caenorhabditis elegans increase period youth health finding thought setback instead launches longevity research phase scientists hone genetic factors harnessed allow older people function younger people today.

science aging maturing age beginning 990s nematode studies led great deal excitement manipulating genes researchers able extend lifespan worms five fold years followed milestone described equivalent human living 400-500 years thought extended period youth vigor accounted increased lifespan study conducted university massachusetts tells different story assessing aging looking variety traits umass research suggests nematode lifespans extended manipulation aging genes actually dominated long healthy youthful period saw extension health mutants aged certain traits invariably trade-off extended period frailty inactivity animal principal investigator umass study heidi tissenbaum different previous studies looked traits associated nematode health tissenbaum’s team identified variety traits used define term healthspan distinguished lifespan discouraging finding push longevity research direction scientists begin honing genes extend health association lifespan extension genes remain physically active age genes allow play tennis we’re 70 similar 40 longevity sole criteria notes tissenbaum professor molecular cellular cancer biology umass program molecular medicine advances.

world nematodes nematodes used great deal aging research they’re simplest multicellular organisms however recent times produced several encouraging achievements life extension research involving animals example methuselah fly naming test animal character hebrew mythology lived 900 years investigators university bern switzerland recently succeeded extending lifespan drosophila melanogaster flies 50-60 percent it’s totally clear time added d melanogaster lifespan dominated extended period health however immediate effects genetic manipulation swiss researchers employed suggests extended health lifespan increase known azot altered gene swiss technique causes efficient elimination bad aging cells throughout fly’s life same time healthy cells maintained support body tissues words azot enhanced quality control gene improved quality control lifetime mean better health azot gene conserved humans fly.

study suggests analogous human effect possible study involving mice brown university revealed aging-relevant gene it’s known myc gene activity reduced mouse lifespan extended percent moreover longevity models involving mammals various health issues commonly associated mouse human aging reduced association lifespan increase specifically brown study showed reduction osteoporosis immunity problems cardiac fibrosis mice decreased myc activity mice incredibly normal long-lived john sedivy senior author study emphasizes important point longevity models caloric restriction treatment rapamycin animals live longer health issues moving ladder larger animals brings recently published results genome bowhead whales animals lifespans approaching 200 years study identified 80 genes able adapt otherwise apply humans we’re likely acquire ability dive underwater equipment hours time hope.

various studies involving species lead age whale water distant shore spot group century-old humans running beach would age twenty david warmflash astrobiologist physician science writer follow cosmicevolution read saying twitter shares facebook twitter google pinterest linkedin digg del stumbleupon tumblr vkontakte print email flattr reddit buffer love weibo pocket xing odnoklassniki managewp.org whatsapp meneame blogger amazon yahoo mail gmail aol newsvine hackernews evernote myspace mail.ru viadeo line flipboard comments yummly sms viber telegram subscribe skype facebook messenger kakao livejournal yammer edgar fintel mix instapaper popular japan poised permit gene editing human embryos 2019 mushrooms protect honey bee disease-carrying varroa mite study shows viewpoint glyphosate study suggesting danger honeybee microbiota detailed sophisticated—and wrong ‘chemical free’ organic industry’s unacknowledged ‘pesticide problem’ sexual assault brain memory gaps unusual roundup-cancer lawsuits filed we’re early stages genetic revolution.

worried viewpoint activists promotion ‘fog misinformation’ gmos challenges science communicators teaching evolution siege turkey israel india pentagon darpa program targeting crop losses turn insects ‘easily weaponized’ biological army critics claim defining life it’s created lab alive maoa cdh13 ‘human warrior genes’ violent criminals—and society popular japan poised permit gene editing human embryos 2019 mushrooms protect honey bee disease-carrying varroa mite study shows viewpoint glyphosate study suggesting danger honeybee microbiota detailed sophisticated—and wrong ‘chemical free’ organic industry’s unacknowledged ‘pesticide problem’ sexual assault brain memory gaps unusual roundup-cancer lawsuits filed we’re early stages genetic revolution worried viewpoint activists promotion ‘fog misinformation’ gmos challenges science communicators teaching evolution siege turkey israel india pentagon darpa program targeting crop losses turn insects ‘easily weaponized’ biological army critics claim defining life it’s created lab alive maoa cdh13 ‘human warrior genes’ violent criminals—and society recommended deep-space travel colonization.

rely genetically engineered life forms life emerged multiple times earth universe glowing trees colonoscopies wonders synthetic biology creating superwoman man benefits human enhancement biotech 2.0 faqs gene editing crispr gene therapy synthetic biology epigenetics personal genomics regulation bioethics gmo faqs fundamentals farming food health safety sustainability labeling regulation bees butterflies facts pesticides pollinators talking biotech explore future food biotech glp biotech profiles analyzing critics shaping debate mission financial transparency governorship team glp boards contributing writers write glp donate copyright contact topics daily food agriculture daily human agricultural laws regulations ancestry evolution biomedical regulations ethics biomedicine disease biotech communications brain neuroscience chemicals pesticides crops food epigenetics gene therapy health wellness human gene editing crispr breeding techniques nbts personal genomics science future sustainability greengenes synthetic biology infographics video podcasts glp articles glp human genetics glp food agriculture special sections glp biotech profiles.

bees butterflies talking biotech gmo science gmo science ii gmo science iii research search glp library search infographics search videos browse authors browse sources glp rss feeds external resources © 2012 2018 genetic literacy project scroll back top glp articles glp food agriculture glp human genetics topics daily food agriculture daily human agricultural laws regulations ancestry evolution biomedical regulations ethics biomedicine disease biotech communications brain neuroscience chemicals pesticides crops food epigenetics gene therapy health wellness human gene editing crispr breeding techniques nbts personal genomics science future sustainability greengenes synthetic biology podcasts infographics videos special sections glp biotech profiles bees butterflies talking biotech gmo science gmo science ii gmo science iii gene editing crispr faqs gene therapy faqs synthetic biology faqs epigenetics faqs personal genomics faqs regulation bioethics faqs gmo faqs research search glp library browse authors.

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Longevity
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GLP-1 from Platypus Venom Gives Hope for New Diabetes Treatment


Researchers have discovered that the same hormone produced in the platypus gut and stinging spurs has potential for type a 2 diabetes treatment to regulate blood glucose levels. Hormone helps diabetics.

He thinks it might worth a lot of money. seems used largely by males fight during breeding. Australia’s oddest creature platypus. Researchers have discovered that the same hormone produced in the platypus gut and stinging spurs has potential for type a 2 diabetes treatment to regulate blood glucose levels. millions years evolution shaped thing fine-tuned he says don’t need milk any platypuses professor grützner fascinated weird animals studying primates pufferfish germany he drawn shores mystery liam mannix photo university adelaide sometimes beauty strangest places tucked heel horny platypus frank grützner found beautiful word first reached european scientists discovery platypus thought had fake hoax made different parts animals stuck together sort franken-duck advertisement can understand why scientists study weirder gets sweats milk feed babies hunts sensing electrical signals hearts prey changes metabolism control body temperature heel spur secretes venom powerful enough kill dog venom professor grützner excited male platypus does use hunting why bother beak can sense heartbeats females humans causes intense pain obviously did prime candidate treating diabetes professor grützner relocated university adelaide 2005 he part team completed first sequence platypus genome time he interested creature’s crazy sex chromosomes mammals sequence completed he got phone call would change career fellow researcher mark myers myers now assistant professor federation university australia calling results sequence genes made up platypus’ insulin system team interested insulin platypuses amazingly seem lack stomach millions genes scattered one he recognised humans had gene coded protein known glp-1 human gut makes meal whereupon stimulates release insulin hormone responsible lowering blood sugar platypus glp-1 differs human versions ways important tinyest single letter dna crucial spot looked saw immediately change single amino acid exactly site peptide degraded enzyme professor grützner says glp-1 designed break quickly human bloodstream otherwise blood sugar would far would end up comatose platypus version degrades slowly makes powerful potential treatment type diabetes body loses ability insulin becomes resistant drug hold insulin levels steady long periods worth billions professor grützner's team had creature kept store glp-1 spotted happens last place would think venom dripping heel spur platypuses heat why would platypus want jab insulin booster mating rival one knows it’s fun question ponder maybe other male would go looking food females professor grützner says can weave beautiful stories scientists go looking evidence remember venom causes excruciating pain team now developed synthetic form platypus hormone avoiding thankless task milking venom randy platypuses seems stimulate insulin production least test tube step giving diabetic mouse 200 000 commercial partner medvet science go towards context promising daunting one current drugs diabetics use form glp-1 comes salivary glands gila monster venomous mexican lizard suggests venom compounds might well suited task type diabetes it’s big market says professor patrick sexton diabetes expert monash university who collaborating professor grützner's team venom research that’s spin part it’s hugely busy space people looking whole range different ways tackle never what’s going thing works drug development long tortuous path stuff even tested mice professor grützner 48 knows even goes right viable drug may developed lifetime might lead anything it’s stable can release insulin least test tube tracker integral ad science
Ancient seafarers
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Fear the Chemistry of Lithium Batteries!

Phones explode because lithium operates by chemical action.
Let's not kid ourselves here: The iPad has had battery "explosions" just as much, if not more than Samsung. It is just that Samsung is more outspoken about issues. Apple believes that if it ignores a problem it will go away. I would like to see the real statistics on all phones.
Phone exploding
Batteries operate by chemical action. What you learned at school was that chemicals are dangerous. The unexpected sometimes happens. Lithium has the capacity to store a lot of energy. This pent-up power is always looking for a way out of its container.

Though the incidents of phones catching fire is very low, the mere thought of something exploding in your pocket is frightening. Lithium batteries are notoriously unstable. They have caused fires on aircraft. Thankfully, no one has yet been killed.

We do not have any alternative to lithium batteries. They are the most efficient and can be made very small. Consumers do not want to go back to nicad or, heaven forbid, alkaline batteries.
 
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PHONE GRENADES
nicad, chemical, action, reaction, batteries, phone, samsung, apple, iphone, power

Antimalarial Drug Artemisinin Made in Green Process

There is a new drug for malaria called artemisinin. It will be synthesized in a chemical process and the procedure is "green". The French pharmaceutical company Sanofi  produces a third of the world's demand annually. Unfortunately, the synthetic drug is expensive.
Sanofi company new chemical process produces antimalarial artemisinin
Click to enlarge.
Most of artemisinin is extracted from sweet wormwood. This is simple but the synthetic version involves the conversion of glucose into artemisinic acid: then three oxygen atoms are bonded on to produce artimsinin. It is complex.

The use of toxic dichloromethane is not used in the new process. It was discovered, ironically, that water greatly assists the synthesis. It packs molecules together. Water-soluble photocatalyst is indeed clean and green. The result is a product that is purer than artemisinin taken directly from wormwood.
Chemistry by Ty Buchanan
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The Reason for the Sodium-Water Explosion is Answered

Many answers have been found for mysterious things in nature. As time moves on most of the reasons why things are have been answered. A few common scientific "happenings" still persist. If sodium is placed in water it explodes. The why has now been identified.

A sodium-water explosion was filmed on high-speed cameras. The flash is caused by sodium hydroxide and hydrogen gases being release when water upsets the balance. Heat creates a point of ignition.

The mystery is that released hydrogen gas should enclose the sodium thus stopping the explosive reaction. Like life itself the answer lies in electricity. All life, such as the nervous system, functions by the flow of electrical current.

When the film of a sodium-water explosion was slowed down electrons (as metal spikes) were seen to jump from sodium into the water. The sodium becomes positive while the water also remains positive because of its mass. Like with magnetism two positive poles repel. It is this that creates the violent explosion. The sodium is destroyed and more electrons leave increasing the contact area with water. This increases the energy of the explosion.
Science by Ty Buchanan
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New Way to Kill Cane Toads

It has recently been discovered that the way to fight the intrusive cane toad in Australia is to fence off all waterholes and dams. Without water they die. Another method has also been identified. A chemical that is in the toad itself is used against it. Tadpoles contain this chemical that kills toad eggs on contact. Those that survive grow at a slower rate than normal, so they are more vulnerable to predators.

The chemical is harmless to native species. Ways of implementing this strategy nationwide need to be developed, but this is only a matter of time. The pest has just reached the far west coast of Australia, leaping its way across the whole country.

West Australians are on search and destroy missions into the night. Queenslanders gave up on this years ago at it had no impact on their numbers. The fight continues.
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Science