Showing posts with label production. Show all posts
Showing posts with label production. Show all posts

Lake Wells in WA Source of Australia's First Potash Production

Potash production has begun in Western Australia at Lake Wells. Australian Potash with two Chinese MuO off-take partners has begun sourcing potassium-rich feeder salts in the amount of 3 tonnes. Lake Wells is 180km from Laverton. A research project with the University of Western Australia in the School of Agriculture and Environment will test the potash on various WA soil types, so Australian Potash will be able to more effectively advise Australian farmers.

first production australian potash near laverton business news search search search form search login username e-mail password remember me login request password menu subscribe advertise free daily emails subscribe renew advertise testimonials contact bn events 40under40 rising stars treasury breakfast success leadership 25th anniversary lunch event calendar event sponsorship publications special reports current issue book lists upcoming features bdo remuneration reports bniq search bniq access bniq news latest headlines public companies journalists podcasts article categories photo gallery thought leadership subscriber news amp amp amp lt img height width style display none src https www.facebook.com tr id 154373030588076 amp amp amp amp amp ev pageview amp amp amp amp amp noscript amp amp amp gt amp amp amp lt img height width style display none src https www.facebook.com tr id 3356617235664 amp amp amp amp amp ev pageview amp amp amp amp amp noscript amp amp amp gt thought leadership business advice remuneration report 25th anniversary aerial view australian potash’s lake wells project first production australian potash near laverton matt birney friday 2 december 201 1 1 facebook twitter linkedin print asx listed australian potash has delivered tonnes potassium-rich feeder salts its lake wells sulphate potash sop project its pilot processing facility located perth production sop trade samples early next quarter

the raw product sourced series evaporation ponds on-site lake wells project located 180km northeast laverton goldfields region wa sop sample verification work perth designed meetings held company’s two chinese mou off-take partners earlier month addition australian potash has developed greenhouse research project university wa’s esteemed school agriculture environment project look value company’s sop product number different wa soil types commence march quarter 201 university research program developed conjunction field trials testing effect sopmop muriate potash – potassium chloride salt – crop yields crop quality associated impact surrounding soil biology company said would recycle 2. tonnes magnesium chloride-rich waste materials evaporation trials road construction tests lake wells access routes first quarter next year australian potash managing director ceo matt shackleton said area focus … past 1 months has been develop refine site evaporation model understanding chemistry salts produced natural evaporation cycle crucial planning both commercial scale development sop processing strategies january 201 we plan produce australia’s first field evaporated sulphate potash enormous value apc mou off-take partners we able detail chemical composition sop we produce running research trial programs 201 allow us further define agronomic benefits apc’s lake wells sop engage end-user farming sector cost supply.

the company holds 100 interest large lake wells sop project completed positive scoping study venture 201 work outlined staged project development whereby australian potash would produce 150 000 tonnes premium sop annum first years then ramp 300 000 tonnes annum least another 1 years project area currently contains mineral resource estimate 14. million tonnes contained sop material reporting indicated category sop ore reserves delineated sop price aud 7 tonne project generates life mine annual operating pre-tax cashflow aud 118m pre-production capex expenditure first stage estimated aud 175m aud 163m higher-volume second stage project development ultimately company expects produce 250kg sulphate potash trade samples initial production run delivery its mou off-take partners interested parties evaluate raw product australian potash ’s dfs has now entered its final phase across abstraction evaporation processing expected released latter half 201 company recently received serious leg-up federal state governments have jointly decided fund upgrade 100km great central road east town laverton adjacent lake wells project has potential significantly improve logistics project optimising freight logistics providing option laverton hub its operations further cost savings result recent mou fellow potash player salt lake potash looking possibility jointly developing infrastructure its neighbouring lake wells project two projects contiguous both companies planning same heavy haulage road transport route lake wells region rail head leonora company has two mou’s place supply 100 000 tonnes annum sulphate potash sino-agri china’s largest agricultural company hubei-agri china’s largest agricultural companies

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Australian potash

Biomass is the Wrong Way forward

Much has been said about the adoption of biomass technology to replace wind and solar energy production. Biomass involves the burning of sugars, starches and oils from crops to make biodiesel and ethanol. The cost of gathering this waste has not been factored in. Wind and solar need maintenance but for the most part they just sit there and do their job.

Farmers have simply left waste in the fields - ultimately burning or plowing them in. They do not see money in gathering up the left overs from crops. Environmentally, biomass looks good. However, financially they are a no-go. Who will pay a higher price for electricity? Charges are already extremely high using coal which is just dug from the ground.

The biggest problem is that biomass involves burning while wind and solar do not. Just substituting biomass for widely available conventional fossil fuels is not a an ideal move forward. This is like electric cars which are only substitutes for petrol motor vehicles - a poor and inefficient one at that.

Saying that biomass can be made from wood and straw and could reduce the use of normal fossil fuels is a mistake. It is not as if oil is running out: it isn't. Australia is a "bowl" of natural resources. We do not have to be efficient with industrial waste like European countries which have to import oil.

To make biomass productive will take capital that Australia does not have. This country has a large deficit. It caused the Coalition government to abandon the carbon tax and redistribute savings back to the consumer. After tax collection costs, the government got very little income from the tax. It is simply not rational for Australia to abandon coal in power generation when other countries do nothing to reduce carbon emissions.
Technology by Ty Buchanan
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Aluminium Once Cost More Than Gold

The metal that could only be made in large quantities when electricity became widely available was once valued more than gold. Eight per cent of the Earth's crust is made up of mineral aluminium such as potassium aluminium sulfate. This was used in times past for fire-proofing and tanning of leather.

Today, it is in baking powder and aftershave. The refinement into aluminum metal wasn't theorized until the late 19th century. Hans christian Oersted created the first sample of the metal in 1825. It was highly contaminated. Sodium was then used by Henri Saint-Claire Deville to produce more. In 1845 scientists found it to be extremely light in weight. By 1855 small ingots were made and its price skyrocketed. Indeed, Napoleon 111 valued his aluminium cutlery more the the gold alternative.

Electrolysis was the major breakthrough in the production of large quantities of aluminium. Bauxite was identified as the best and plentiful source material. The price fell 80 per cent almost immediately as it became the cheapest metal available. The price fall is notable: $US1,200 a kilo in 1852 to $US1.00 in the 20th century for the same amount.
Science by Ty Buchanan

Free-Range Eggs Definition Questioned by ACCC

Law is just pedantic. Legal proceedings are to be undertaken to define the precise meaning of "free to roam" chicken. Can chicken roam freely when they are packed into barns? The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) is arguing that the high population density of barn chicken prevents them roaming freely. Turi Foods, Baiada Poultry and the Australian Chicken Meat Federation are accused of misleading advertising.

The court case could fall either way. There is no doubt television adds showing chicken wandering with large spaces between them are not showing the true condition. However, a chicken is free to move if another chicken moves out of the way first in normal barn chicken egg production. Of course free-range chicken supporters are in favor of the ACCC action.

There isn't much doubt that the real truth about barn production is not being shown in the advertisements. Other products are also not telling the truth in advertising either and the ACCC is not going after them. For example, hamburgers shown in adverts have plastic and paint in them and they are shown larger than actual size. Perhaps the Government is at fault here - there are no clear guidelines on what free range actually means.
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Agriculture