Saturday, February 28, 2015

Cat Fool

Cat and dog play
"You don't fool me, cat."
 
 ✴ Funny Animal Pictures by Ty Buchanan 
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Solution to Bee Die-Off?

It is not widely known just how important bees are to maintain our food output, let alone to increase it as demand strengthens. There are so many mysteries to why bees are dying off across the world. Many theories are put forward. Unfortunately, there are few answers to the problem.
We need to look after the human friendly insect. It could eventually be found that bees are being killed off by chemicals. However, like other animals bees need chemicals to treat illnesses. When they become infected they change their foraging habits seeking pollen from plants that store certain chemicals. The solution to bee die-off could lie in studying this phenomenon.

Plants synthesize chemicals that attract select species of pollinators. Other substance also deter potential attackers. Herbivores have been real pests to plants for millions of years. Eating the leaves can kill plants. Insects have evolved to go where plant toxins drive herbivores away.

All nectar is not the same. If toxins can drive away herbivores, beneficial elements could attract bees as and when the insects needs it. A study infected bees with a gut parasite. One group was fed on sucrose while another group was given secondary compounds from plant nectar. The amount of parasite infestation was greatly reduced in the group which consumed secondary compounds.
✴ Chemistry by Ty Buchanan
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
            Australian Blog   Adventure Australia
ALL BLOG ARTICLES· ──► (BLOG HOME PAGE)

Friday, February 27, 2015

Flying Dogs

"We always have such fun together, buzzing here, bouncing there."
 
 ✴ Funny Animal Photos by Ty Buchanan 
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

New Peacock Spider Species in Australia

The discovery of new species in Australia is no longer a surprise. However, it is extremely interesting. Jumping (peacock) spiders, Salticidae, are the largest family of the Araneae. Peacock spiders are so called because of their bright colors.
Skeleton spider Skeletorus, Maratus sceletus
Two new species have been identified. They are named Skeletorus, Maratus sceletus, and Sparklemuffin, Maratus jactatus. The former is black with white stripes and some blue in the background. It does look like a skeleton. Sparklemuffin is blue with a unique red pattern.

Peacock spiders jump and dance around showing off their colorful abdomens. Due to prevalent predators males need to be seen by females to successfully breed and continue their existence. They have adapted well and have diversified into many types.
Science by Ty Buchanan
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
            Australian Blog   Adventure Australia
ALL BLOG ARTICLES· ──► (BLOG HOME PAGE)